The White Balloon (1995) Review ― A Uniquely Structured Neorealist Drama

Jafar Panahi’s debut feature about a little girl’s quest to buy a goldfish becomes a vivid study of the little things and emotions, often neglected and forgotten in the hustle and bustle of daily routine, that constitute everyday life. With a screenplay written by another legend of Iranian cinema, Abbas Kiarostami, The White Balloon won…

The New Wave of Political Satire — An Interview with Julian Radlmaier

For admirers of Buñuel and Godard, Julian Radlmaier’s brand of cinema should feel right at home while also offering a fresh take on well-trodden subjects. This new experimental filmmaker, based in Berlin, has impressed festival audiences and critics alike with his debut feature Self-Criticism of a Bourgeois Dog (which we have written about here), which won the…

Archiving the Subconscious — An Interview with Jay Rosenblatt

The name Jay Rosenblatt hardly needs any introduction for those who take a keen interest in the world of short and experimental filmmaking. This San Francisco-based found footage filmmaker has been capturing the imagination of his viewers through his hypnotic and thought-provoking collection of films that have won numerous awards at prestigious film festivals across…

The Projection Room’s Oscar Predictions 2018 — Who Will Win?

It is that time of the year again. When the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences honours the best achievements made in the film industry the past year with the prestigious Oscar award. 2017 has been particularly impressive regarding the huge number of excellent films it has produced, ensuring that the 90th Academy Awards…

The Shape Of Water (2017) Review — Poetry On Celluloid

Guillermo Del Toro’s personal masterpiece, The Shape Of Water, is a monumental achievement in creative filmmaking. As he himself says, it is “a fairy tale for troubled times”. Set during the Cold War, this fiercely imaginative, gorgeously outlandish tale of an amphibian man bonding with a mute woman also proves to be surprisingly universal in…

Counterpart S01E04 “Both Sides Now” Review — Switching Things Up

I wrote last week as to how S01E03 showed languish in narrative development almost all through the episode, slowly but surely knitting together pieces, only to turn up the heat towards the very end with a quick succession of events that get things back on track and promise exciting days ahead. Well, Counterpart seems to be…

Self-Criticism of a Bourgeois Dog (2017) Review ― Radlmaier’s Astounding Debut

Julian Radlmaier is a fascinating filmmaker indeed. Effortlessly unique and with a taste for the satirical, this new age avant-garde director knows how to take on weighty issues and present them in a manner that’s surprisingly entertaining. Despite being a sympathizer of communism himself, Radlmaier never shies away from commenting upon its inefficacy or the…